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Academic Lineage

Early in my PhD program I became interested in my academic lineage.  I learned from the first day of working with my PhD advisors (as an undergraduate) that they were friendly with and had worked with a number of very skilled scientists throughout their career.  Through a series of discussions over a number of years, I began to understand that an academic lineage is not simply a straight line from advisor to mentored student as written on a thesis document.  For this reason, the important or critical individuals who mentor someone can become more central than their primary advisor.

The lineage I've constructed below, with the help of online sources (some of which have sadly disappeared), reflects what I believe to be my academic lineage.  I've tried to add notes in some places on various connections.

I list them in chronological order and include ****BREAK POINT**** for instances where there is a split or connection to another line.  I am unsure of some of the spelling and will continue to revise as I have time and inclination.

The most interesting connecting individuals, in my estimation, are Richard Abegg, George Gibson, Glenn Seaborg, and F. Albert Cotton. I include Cotton solely because of the daunting number of doctoral students he supervised during his lifetime (76).

Gay-Lussac Line
G. Glaser
N. Lemery
J.G. Spitzley
Guillaume François Rouelle
Jean BM Bucguet
Antoine François, comte de Fourcroy
Claude-Louis Berthollet
Joseph-Louis Gay-Lussac
Jules Gay-Lussac ****BREAK POINT****
Justus von Liebig ****BREAK POINT****
NB: It was Joseph-Louis Gay-Lussac who had a sun Jules.  Jules grew interested in the sciences and worked with von Liebig.  This connection is one of the truly interesting ones connecting lines. Also, Fourcroy and Berthollet were contemporaries both of whom mentored Gay-Lussac and worked with each other without making a distinct division in lineage.

Liebig Line
Georg Erhard Hamberger
Christoph Andreas Mangold
Ernst Gottfried Baldinger
Johann Christian Wiegleb
Johann Friedrich August Göttling
Karl Wilhelm Gottlob Kastner
Justus von Liebig ****BREAK POINT****
A.W. Hofmann
Richard Abegg ****BREAK POINT****
George Gibson ****BREAK POINT****
NB: This lineage I pieced together from an online source that no longer existed when I returned to look for it.  I'm therefore pleased I had managed to write it down (by hand no less) a few years ago when drawing out the lineage. The interesting part of this lineage is Gibson and Abegg.  Gibson really brought two groups together.  Also, Abegg had two other well known scientists as mentors and collaborators whose lines are below.

Arrhenius Line
Svente Arrhenius
Richard Abegg ****BREAK POINT****
NB: Abegg, who died at the age of 41 in a ballooning accident had Hofman as an advisor, but changed fields and later was mentored and worked mostly with Arrhenius and Nernst

Nernst Line
Walther Nernst
Richard Abegg ****BREAK POINT****
NB: Abegg, who died at the age of 41 in a ballooning accident had Hofman as an advisor, but changed fields and later was mentored and worked mostly with Arrhenius and Nernst

Ryff Line
Petrus Ryff
Emmanuel Stupanus
Franciscus de la Boe Sylvius
Burchard de Volder
Hermann Boerhaave
Gerard van Swieten
Anton von Störck
Joseph Barth
Georg Joseph Beer
Philip F. von Walther ****BREAK POINT****

Belleral Line
P.R. Belleral
J.P. Laugier
J.P. Magnal
J.P. Tournefort
J.G. Duvernoy
V.A. von Haller
G.M. Gattenhof
J.P. Frank
Philip F. von Walther ****BREAK POINT****
NB: This line I gathered from a source that I can no longer find online. 

Helmholtz Line
Philip F. von Walther ****BREAK POINT****
Johannes P. Muller
Hermann von Helmholtz
Otto R. Lummer
George Gibson ****BREAK POINT****
NB: This line, through Gibson and Walther was the chief connection I made looking through documents online a few years ago.  it connects the Gay-Lussac line (and therefore the Arrhenius and Nernst lines through Abegg) to Helmholtz and the other older lines.

Gibson Line
George Gibson ****BREAK POINT****
Glenn T. Seaborg ****BREAK POINT****
Geoffrey Wilkinson
F. Albert Cotton
Dave & Jane Richardson ****BREAK POINT****
NB: Dave Richardson got his PhD in the laboratory of Cotton at MIT solving the 3D structure of staph nuclease becoming the 10th such crystal structure of a protein to be solved by x-ray crystallography.  Through discussions with Dave & Jane (my advisors) it became clear to me that the interactions and work with Anfinsen were as critical an influence as Cotton was.  They often cite them both as mentors to them.

Lawrence Line
William Francis Gray Swann
Ernest O. Lawrence
Glenn T. Seaborg ****BREAK POINT****
NB: Seaborg and Lawrence were very close working on many different isotopes and fathering nuclear chemistry and big-science.  Interestingly, Seaborg married the secretary of Lawrence during the ramp up of The Manhattan Project.

Anfinsen Line
Ernest L. Scott
Albert Baird Hastings
Christian B. Anfinsen
Dave & Jane Richardson ****BREAK POINT****
NB: Through discussions with Dave & Jane (my advisors) it became clear to me that the interactions and work with Anfinsen were as critical an influence as Cotton was.  They often cite them both as mentors to them.




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